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Symptoms Which May be Caused by Adrenal Dysfunction

Symptoms Which May be Caused by Adrenal Dysfunction

Alcohol Intolerance General Pain Shoulder Pain
Allergies Hair Loss Sinus Problems
Anxiety Headaches Sleep Disorders
Bacterial Infections Heart Palpitations Thyroid Disorders
Blood Sugar Imbalances Immune Deficiency Weakness
Chronic Illness Inability to Concentrate Weight Gain/Loss
Craving for Sweets Infertility
Craving for Salt Irritability
Depression Liver Disorders
Difficulty Building Muscle Low Back Pain
Digestive Disorders Low Blood Pressure
Diminished Sex Drive Low Body Temperature
Dizziness Upon Standing Mood Swings
Dry and Thin Skin Neck Pain
Excessive Hunger Pancreatic Disorders
Exhaustion Parasite Infections
Food Intolerances PMS
Fungal Infections Poor Memory
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Weight Loss Solutions

Weight Loss Solutions


Eating Healthy, Eating Smart

Dr. D’Brant’s cutting edge Infinite Wellness nutrition plan will help you lose weight, achieve balance, and feel better about yourself.  Start with the basics: The food you eat should be 30% protein, 40% non-starchy carbohydrate, and 30% healthy fats. 1400 daily calories assure that you’re never hungry and healthy carbohydrates are allowed, stopping cravings before they start. It’s easy.

Eating organic, unprocessed, whole foods is vital to your success in losing weight. Dr. D’Brant recommends gluten-free foods to minimize potential allergic responses that can hamper achieving optimum weight loss and maximize absorption of your nutrients.

Why Eating Healthy is Not Enough

Nutritional supplements boost the effects of healthy diet and exercise. Dr. D’Brant has traveled the world in search of the highest quality supplements and protein shakes, and now he’s offering them to you. Snacking can be the hardest part when choosing healthier options. When you’re at work, running around with kids, or on the road, finding a healthy snack can be nearly impossible. But how would you feel knowing you could whip up a delicious chocolate, vanilla, berry or banana shake in 30 seconds, take it to go, and still be true to your nutrition plan? Gluten free or vegan? No problem.

And not all protein shakes are the same. You may find cheaper versions in stores, but their cheaper ingredients will undermine your weight loss efforts and can even add pounds with the added sugars! The high quality proteins in Fit Food shakes help to add and maintain lean body mass while supporting your immune health.

In addition to protein shakes, supplements should be part of your nutrition plan. They boost your absorption of healthy nutrients, maintain healthy body composition, and help to burn fat fast. Dr. D’Brant suggests taking MinRX, ConjuLean, and CarniteX if you want to see the best results in the shortest time.

The Dehydrated Dieter

High quality, pure water and enzymes are essential for weight loss. Supplements help absorb nutrients while drinking plenty of water keeps you hydrated and feeling your best. The Institute of Medicine recommends that women get 9 cups (about 2.2 liters) of fluid daily, and you can get 20% of this from organic fruits and vegetables.  Here are some tips to keep you on track:

  • In hot weather or when exercising, increase the amount of water you drink.
  • Alcohol, particularly wine and hard liquor, will dehydrate you (and pack on the belly fat). Increase your water intake or better yet, cut the amount of alcohol you drink back to once a week.
  • Kick the bottled water habit. Filter your tap water to remove impurities and chlorine, and to improve the taste. Go Green Bonus: You’ll reduce the amount of water bottles that end up in the landfills each year.

Exercise

In addition to your nutrition plan, Dr. D’Brant recommends 4-6 minutes a day of high intensity exercise with an X-Iser®. Visit our exercise page to find out how 4-6 minutes a day could give you the body you’ve been dreaming of.

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Stress can be Stressful

Stress can be Stressful

Stress – everyone knows what it is and everyone wishes they had less of it.  The terms “stressed out”, “overstressed”, “stressed to the max” and “stressbuster” have become so common place in our language that everyone knows what we are referring to when we use them.  The concept of stress is so widely accepted as part of our fast-paced modern day life that no one blinks an eye when we talk about it, but so little is known about the long term health effects of continual exposure to stress.

Up until twenty years ago, scientists would acknowledge that physical stress could be harmful to the body.  However, it is only within the last ten to fifteen years that scientists have begun to recognize and study the profound effects of psychological stress on health.

In that time, scientists and researchers have been able to demonstrate the connection between psychological stress and the immune system and map out the mechanisms by which they interact.  It is now clear that severe or sustained stress can weaken the immune system, increase blood pressure, increase fat deposition around the waist, increase the rate at which we age and damage our brain cells that have to do with memory.  It has been implicated in diseases as far ranging as diabetes, heart disease, rheumatoid arthritis, obesity, fibromyalgia, anxiety and depression among others.

Research done over the last fifteen years, reveals that 43% of all adults suffer significant adverse effects from stress exposure and 75% to 90% of all visits to primary care physicians are related in some way to the negative effects due to stress.  It is estimated that on an average workday, approximately one million workers are absent from their jobs due to stress-related complaints.  The demand for stress management programs, services and products has risen dramatically in the last ten to fifteen years and is now estimated to exceed eleven billion dollars annually.

Some stress in small to moderate amounts can be benign, even helpful.  For instance, think about studying for a test, preparing to address a group or slamming on the brakes to avoid a car accident.  All of these are stressful events which require the body to go through a series of adaptive changes involving the endocrine system, the immune system, the cardiovascular system and the nervous system, particularly the brain.

Adrenaline and cortisol, both stress hormones produced by the adrenal glands pour into the body, accompanied by increases in blood pressure, heart rate and respiration; oxygen flows to the muscles preparing the body to employ “the fight or flight” mechanism.  While this may have been life saving for our ancestors who were suddenly faced with a the threat of being eaten by a lion, this response when sustained in today’s stress saturated world creates long term health consequences, often leading to serious dysfunction or disease.

A Carnegie Mellon University research project indicated that volunteers who were inoculated with a cold virus who reported life stresses that continued for more than one month (ie. unemployment or family health problems) were more likely to get colds than those who sustained stress lasting less than a month.  The longer the stress endured, the greater the risk of illness.

Each person’s response to stress is different.  It is based partly on genetics, environment, socio-economic status and lifestyle.  Factors that can make your response to stress worse include:  staying late at work, eating diets rich in processed, simple carbohydrates, eating fatty foods, drinking excessively, inadequate sleep, smoking, lack of exercise, isolation from others and excessive competition.

During times where stress can be particularly high, it is even more important to be mindful of the factors that can make our responses worse. It’s important to take time out, to breathe, and to find balance in your life to function at your best and stay healthy.

More tips on how you can support your adrenals from stress. 

 

 

 

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The Three Phases of Stress

The Three Phases of Stress

 1)    Alarm – a response to any physical, emotional or mental trauma will cause a sudden release of stress hormones such as cortisol.  Normal levels of immunes system resistance diminish, but if the stress is not persistent or too severe, we bounce back and recover nicely.

2)    Resistance – If the stress factors persist and become chronic, our response changes and we learn to “adapt” or tolerate the stressful stimulus.  We increase our resistance during this phase and although usually a safe period, our immune and others systems are working harder and under more strain in their attempt to keep us “adapted”.

3)    Exhaustion – Eventually our immune system runs out of gas and becomes “exhausted” following prolonged stress reactions.  When we reach this point our bodies, which have been coping up until this point with perhaps only minor or low grade symptoms will respond in a different way.  Depending on each person’s unique physiology, symptoms will become increasingly severe or may appear, as if overnight, where seemingly the person was perfectly fine before.  Eventually, profound disruption of the person’s immune system will manifest.

 

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Basic Guidelines for Nutrition and Stress

Basic Guidelines for Nutrition and Stress

  1. Don’t skip meals, especially breakfast!  Our mothers were right.  Breakfast is the most important meal of the day.  The morning is the time of day when our hormonal clocks get started.  Not eating tells the body that you are going to start your day with an empty tank.  Hormonally this is a disaster since your blood sugar and insulin (part of the endocrine system) have to respond to the absence of nutrition as a stress inducing event.
  2. Avoid caffeine in all its forms.  This includes coffee, tea, chocolate and soda. Caffeine induces a fight of flight response much the same as if you were experiencing a stressful event.  This in turn depletes your stores of B vitamins which are important in coping with stress.
  3. Avoid alcohol, which also depletes our B vitamins.
  4. Avoid sugar, all of its derivatives (i.e. splenda, etc.) and processed white flour in all of its forms.  Sugar has almost no nutritional value of its own and requires a significant amount of energy to assimilate, therefore all of that energy in the form of minerals and vitamins is going to come from your body, further depleting our vitamin stores.
  5. Eat foods that are “whole”, not broken down or processed.  This includes whole grains instead of white flour, full cooked oatmeal instead of the instant or three minute type, and whole fresh vegetables and fruits instead of canned or frozen.
  6. Eat organic foods wherever possible.  Eating non-organic foods is a stressful event for the body in several ways.  Firstly, the ever growing amount of chemicals that are in our food require our bodies to work extra hard and often overwhelm our bodies abilities to detoxify what we have burdened them with.  This most certainly drains our nutrients in a major way.  Secondly, recent studies have indicated that commercial fruits and vegetables have as little as fifty percent of the nutrients that they are supposed to have in them.  This is because we strip farm the same land over and over again, depleting it of is vitamin and mineral density, thereby rending our food less nutrient dense.
  7. Eat four to five small meals a day, instead of “three square meals” each day. Eating smaller, more frequent meals puts much less stress on the digestive system and therefore makes it easier to assimilate food and regulate hormonal (insulin and glucagon) imbalances.
  8. Eat within one hour after waking (for most people).  Our hormonal clock starts ticking as soon as we get up, if we don’t eat within an hour, our bodies perceive that as a stressor and respond appropriately.
  9. Avoid eating within two hours of laying down or going to sleep.  Digestion requires gravities help.  Laying down after we eat slows the digestive process considerably thereby overtaxing our bodies capabilities.
  10. Avoid all extremely cold or hot foods in general.  Traditional  Chinese medicine philosophy believes that extremely hot/cold foods delay and impair our digestion considerably, making the body work much harder to do what could be done with much less energy and vitamin and mineral expenditure.
  11. Remember that stress depletes our vitamins and minerals.  Some experts say the usage of vitamins and minerals when we are under stress can be as high as ten times as fast as when we are unstressed.  Make nutritional choices that ease the bodies need to adapt and put out more energy, thereby depleting us less
  12. Generally, our food and water quality have gone down considerably in the last fifty years, along with a rise in stressors that deplete our vitamin and mineral stores.  Therefore, taking a high quality, easily absorbable multivitamin/mineral complex several times a day is recommended.
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Some Basic Guidelines for Preparing to Eat

Some Basic Guidelines for Preparing to Eat

  1. As important as what you eat are the conditions at the time of when you eat.  Many people today eat when they are standing up or multitasking (i.e. watching tv, getting dressed, making breakfast for the children, etc.)  Standing up is very bad for digestion in that you are not at rest and focused on what you are doing, eating and taking in nourishment.  Multitasking is the same thing….there is no awareness of what is happening in the act of eating.

 

  1. Eat sitting down and without external stimuli as much as possible.  Pay attention to your food:  what does it look like, how does is smell, is it warm or cold.  Remember that what you are doing is a sacred act of nourishing your body with food from the earth.

 

  1. Take a few minutes and be quiet before you take the first bite of food and give thanks for the nourishment you are going to receive.  If prayer is part of your ritual, then include appreciation to your higher power for the food in front of you.

 

  1. Eat slowly.  Food digestion begins with seeing it, saliva collects in the mouth and as you start to chew, ptyalin (salivary amylase) starts the active part of digestion.  Optimally each mouthful can be chewed thirty to forty times before swallowing.  One tip here:  put the fork down in between mouthfuls.  This will prevent the all too common occurrence of shoveling the food into our mouths before we have even barely started chewing the mouthful already there!

 

  1. When eating drink small sips of water only.  Do not down big gulps of water in between each mouthful.  This dilutes the digestive chyme or juices present in the stomach and retards the breakdown of food significantly.
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Five Things You Can do to De-Stress Your Adrenal Glands…

Five Things You Can do to De-Stress Your Adrenal Glands…

And they don’t cost a dime!

  • Breathe! – every morning spend ten minutes breathing quietly.  The simple act of conscious breathing creates profound benefits for the body and sets the tone for the entire day.
  • Eat in a calm, peaceful environment.  Turn off all electrical devices such as televisions, radios, cell phones, etc. while eating.  Quiet talk with family or friends is fine but do so without any other stimulation at all.
  • Chew your food slowly and thoroughly.  The process of slowly chewing your food helps relieve the body of stress in attempting to digest food that is too large.  The recommended amount of chewing is between twenty and thirty times for each mouthful of food.
  • Spend ten minutes every day either outside in sunshine or sitting in a window where sun comes through (if it is too cold to go outside).  Do this quietly or with gentle, relaxing music playing in the background.
  • Go to sleep no later than 10:30 pm.  This helps the adrenal glands regulate the quality and character of your sleep.  Going to bed later puts a stress on the system that can make sleep more difficult and not as nourishing.  This may require that you turn off the television earlier to allow yourself time to relax and be ready for sleep.
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Aromatherapy and Stress

Aromatherapy and Stress 

Aromatherapy has been in use for over 3000 years.  Early papyrus leaves were found in Egypt depicting different scents being used for treating various conditions.  The practice of using different essential oils and scents was also used in China and India as part of their health care systems.

The process of inhaling aromas from plant oils directly affects the olfactory nerves located in the top of each nostril.  These nerves in turn have been demonstrated to have a direct connection with the limbic system, that part of the brain most associated with our emotional responses and moods.  Therefore it is reasonable to conclude that smelling essential oils derived from plants can have en effect on our emotional health, certainly they can be used to reduce stress or mental tension.

Below is a partial list of essential oils for stress related problems.  By no means is it complete but rather it should be seen as a starting place for your exploration of what feels good and works for you.

  • Anger, Anxiety:  Basil, bergamot, chamomile, clary sage, cypress, frankincense, geranium, hyssop, jasmine, juniper, lavender, marjoram, melissa, neroli, ylang ylang
  • Depression:  Basil, clary sage, grapefruit, jasmine, lavender, melissa, neroli, rose, sandalwood, vetiver, ylang ylang.
  • Insomnia:  Basil, chamomile, lavender, mandarin, marjoram, melissa, neroli, petitgrain, rose, sandalwood, thyme, ylang ylang
  • Nervous Exhaustion:  Basil, cinnamon, citronella, coriander, ginger, grapefruit, hyssop, jasmine, lavender, lemon grass, peppermint, nutmeg, rosemary ylang ylang
  • Nervous Tension:  Basil, bergamot, cedarwood, chamomile, cinnamon, frankincense, germanium, jasmine, lavender, marjoram, melissa, neroli, palmarosa, rosemary, vetiver, ylang ylang
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Ten Holiday Tips for Keeping the Fat Off!

Ten Holiday Tips for Keeping the Fat Off!

During these often stressful holiday times, people ask what they can do to not add pounds
of weight/fat that seem impossible to avoid and also impossible to get off after the holidays
are over. Here are some helpful hints to make it through the holidays without turning into
the “stuffed goose”.

Here are the holiday tips:

1. Drink two glasses of water thirty minutes before you eat a meal. Not only will this help
you feel fuller before you start to eat but drinking water before a meal also increases the
production of stomach acid which will help you digest your food better.

2. Use spice more frequently with food. Spicy foods such as cayenne, peppers, cumin,
pepper, etc can slow the rate of sugar entering the bloodstream and increase the amount
of calories burned in response to a meal.

3. Increase your fiber intake during the holidays. Use PaleoFiber because it is excellent
in lowering both blood sugar and insulin levels which are going to rise up due to eating
heavier, more carbohydrate laden holiday meals.

4. Eat vinegar before each meal. Vinegar helps to decrease blood sugar and insulin
responses to a very starchy meal. When you eat vinegar before a meal your blood sugar
and insulin levels don’t rise up as much. The simplest way to do this is to take about a
shots worth of vinegar right before you eat or add that amount onto your salad.

5. Drink fresh squeezed lemon juice before a meal. This has much the same properties as
does vinegar for lowering your blood sugar and insulin response to a high starch meal.
You can drink a third of a cup of fresh squeezed lemon juice directly or put this amount
onto your salad.

6. If you are going to eat deserts during this season, choose ones that contain berries or cinnamon. Cinnamon helps to regulate blood sugar and insulin levels and berries are very
low on the glycemic index scale and help to stimulate fat loss and slow weight gain from
a high fat meal.

7. Make sure to drink green tea when consuming high fat meals. Green tea has been
demonstrated to decrease the absorption of fat and to increase fat loss by stimulating fat
burning genes. If you are caffeine sensitive of course be careful here, but other than that
there is really no downside to drinking green tea often.

8. Remember to eat slowly. As mouthwatering as those holiday foods are, if you take the
time to chew each mouthful twenty to thirty times you will significantly decrease the
amount of food you eat. Eating this slowly gives your body a chance to become more
satisfied, resulting in less desire to overeat or stuff ourselves.

9. While eating a meal and when you burp for the first time, it’s time to stop eating.
Burping is the body’s natural way of telling us that it is full or close to it and going any
further will just result in us reaching the “stuffed” zone.

10. Exercise one hour before eating a big meal. This way when you do consume a high fat/
carbohydrate laden meal, some of those calories consumed will go into building muscle
instead of storing as fat.